Making A Giclee Print

Stages In Producing a Giclee Print

Starting from an original, to get to the print requires three stages :

Digitising

Colour matching

Printing

The first two stages are commonly known as the Setup.

J Framing and Pictures has the all facilities to handle an image from the original to a print.

Digitising

Epson Scanner The original image is either scanned or photographed digitally. If the image is too large for the camera or scanner then the image is divided into sections, each section is photographed separately and then put back together again in the computer.

The end result is the original image copied into the computer. The detail of the image is all correct however the colours will probably not be very accurate.

Colour Matching

Once in the image is in the computer it can be colour matched. Using Photoshop or similar the individual colours or the copy are matched to the original image.

Sometimes this process is easy however when a number of different colours are involved it can be quite lengthy.

Each time one or more colours are modified the image must be printed to ensure that the colour is accurate. If not then it must be modified further.

The end result here is an image copied into the computer that has colours that match closely the original. The colour matched image is normally archived at this point so that in the event of computer problems the image is not lost.

The copied image may now be used to produce prints and cards.

Printing

Images are printed either on paper or artist canvas.

J Framing and Pictures has an Epson 9900 printer (shown right) which is 44" wide and can be used to print onto all photographic and fine art papers and canvasses.

Only original Epson ink cartridges are used so that the very highest standards are maintained.

When they are printed the size may be changed sometimes quite drastically. For example an original sized at 36" x 48" may be reduced down to 6" by 8" without any loss of image quality. Equally the printing system is so good that is possible to magnify an image several times.